Pendulum Press Release 8/11/2017

Pictured: Dunkin’ Donuts Park in Hartford, CT.

Photo Credit: Robert Benson Photography

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Hartford, Conn., August 11, 2017 – Dunkin’ Donuts Park, home of the Colorado Rockies’ Eastern League affiliate Hartford Yard Goats, has been awarded BaseballParks.com’s “Ballpark of the Year”.  The award was announced in the August 9th edition of USA TODAY Sports Weekly by Joe Mock, webmaster and founder of BaseballParks.com and frequent contributor to USA TODAY.

This prestigious honor has been awarded to new or substantially renovated ballparks for the last 18 years, and this year in particular featured formidable competition. Dunkin’ Donuts Park was selected from an all-star cast of facilities including SunTrust Park, the new home of the Atlanta Braves, and The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches, the spring training home of the Houston Astros and Washington Nationals.

Jonathan Cole, founding principal of Kansas City, MO-based Pendulum, was Architect of Record for Dunkin’ Donuts Park.  He was joined by key members of the design team including Peter Newman, principal of Newman Architects and The S/L/A/M Collaborative’s Rick Bouchard, Chris Sziabowski, and Derek Czenczelewski on the pregame announcement with Joe Mock on the Yard Goats’ radio broadcast.

“As Architects and designers, we work diligently to make positive contributions to the built environment” said Cole.  “When our work is recognized as being significant in the sports marketplace, in the local community, and nationally by an institution like BaseballParks.com, it is incredibly meaningful. Joe Mock has visited 349 ballparks and counting, so when he and his distinguished panel say a ballpark is good, it carries a lot of weight. We are deeply appreciative of this honor.  It’s something we’ll never forget. It was even more special that we were able to be present with the team when it was announced.”

Joe Mock added “I actually visited the ballpark while it was still under construction. I could tell immediately that it was going to be something special.  When I came back to check out the finished product, I was blown away.  Not only is it supremely fun to attend a Yard Goats game, the design of the park itself is spectacular. It has the intimacy of small Minor League park, while providing all the amenities of a big-league stadium. From the YG Club behind home plate to the Budweiser Sky Bar high above center field, every inch of Dunkin’ Donuts Park is well-thought-out and expertly designed. This really sets the bar for any Minor League park to be built in the future.”

Dunkin’ Donuts Park now joins an elite list of award recipients, including Major League Baseball stadium icons like AT&T Park, home of the San Francisco Giants, Petco Park, home of the San Diego Padres, and PNC Park, home of the Pittsburgh Pirates.

“The design of Dunkin’ Donuts Park is timeless, a generous mix of the baseball nostalgia, that people love coupled with forward thinking amenities that offer our fans a big-league experience in a very compact footprint,” added Josh Solomon, owner of the Yard Goats.  “The fact that the ballpark is creating the excitement that we hoped it would with the fans, which will lead to further transformation of the surrounding neighborhoods, is proof that the city of Hartford picked the right design team for the job.”

“Dunkin’ Donuts Park is a spectacular ballpark that combines the intimate, family-friendly feel of Minor League ball with the architectural quality of a big-league park,” according to Hartford’s Mayor Luke Bronin. “That’s one of the reasons Yard Goats games are selling out week after week and bringing thousands of fans and families to the downtown, which really adds to the City’s energy. It’s an honor to have BaseballParks.com recognize that the result truly stands out among parks across the country, including several Major League facilities.”

-end-

Contact:

  • Pendulum: Jonathan O’Neil Cole AIA, NCARB, NOMA
    • jonathan@Pendulumkc.com
    • (816) 399-5251
  • S/L/A/M Collaborative: Derek Czenczelewski
    • dczenczelewski@slamcoll.com
    • (860) 368-2371
  • Newman Architects: Howard Hebel
    • hhebel@newmanarchitects.com
    • (203) 772-1990

Pendulum’s 10 Year Anniversary Countdown Day 01

May 18, 2017 marks Pendulum’s tenth year in business.  We’ll be adding an image of a featured built project each day for the next eighteen days as we march toward our official incorporation day.  We will then reveal our commemorative ten-year logo and other fun things along the way.

Day 01

Today’s featured project is a small restroom and storage building that we call “Rooftop Hospitality”.  Located in the Power & Light District of Kansas City, MO above Consentino’s Downtown Market garage, this project is one of our early built works that showcased our improvisational design skills.

In 2009 the City of Kansas City, MO desired to host events on the roof of the then new parking garage but were lacking restroom accommodations and therefore did not meet minimum public assembly requirements.  Although this project was inspired by modular studies that were in the early stages of research and development amongst our design staff, “Rooftop Hospitality” was built using conventional construction methodology.  Even so, we learned critical lessons that served as the foundation for concepts and ideas that we advanced and presented to clients ranging from government officials interested in disaster relief modules for Port Au Prince, Haiti to baseball team owners in search of economical infrastructure solutions.


Disaster Relief Prototype – Office/exam room

Ballpark Prefab Restroom

Cabana Suite Prototype

 

 

 

 

Long-awaited plans unveiled for a new Bakersfield Blaze ballpark

BY JOHN COX Californian staff writer jcox@bakersfield.com

After months, if not years, of anticipation, Bakersfield got the good news Thursday: a new ballpark is firmly in the works. Owners of the Bakersfield Blaze unveiled plans for a privately financed, 3,500-seat stadium that would become the first-phase centerpiece of the Bakersfield Commons mixed-use development project at Coffee and Brimhall roads.  Construction is expected to begin early next year and the ballpark could open in 2014, although not necessarily by the start of the baseball season. The $20 million stadium essentially would replace the county’s aging Sam Lynn Ballpark with a family-oriented facility to be accompanied eventually by new restaurants, retail and entertainment such as a new movie theater.  “The idea of this is to be more than just a baseball field,” said Gene Voiland, a prominent local oil executive who together with Bakersfield oilman Chad Hathaway purchased the Blaze last spring.  “We are putting together an entertainment complex.”  If approved as proposed, the 15-acre project would crown decades of sometimes frustrating negotiations aimed at giving Bakersfield a new baseball stadium. It would also comprise the “anchor tenant” considered key to attracting retail tenants to the 255-acre Bakersfield Commons project.  While the stadium would present new opportunities — it is expected to become a venue for concerts and, potentially, Cal State Bakersfield baseball — it also carries financial risks for the team’s new owners. By their own estimate, the new stadium will have to draw an average of 2,500 spectators per game, or about five times the typical Blaze home game at Sam Lynn. The expectation is that the project will bring The Blaze into the black financially, the team owners said Thursday.

Amenities

The team hopes to sell advertising at the stadium and offer naming rights. There would also be up to eight executive suites, as well as lower priced seating on grassy berms, together increasing capacity by 1,500 people. The Blaze will move its offices and training facilities to the site, and roughly double its full-time staff to as many as 20 employees. Many will be assigned to develop non-baseball revenue opportunities, Blaze General Manager Elizabeth Martin indicated.  Voiland and Hathaway disclosed their plans to The Californian Thursday morning, shortly before filing for a conditional use permit with the city of Bakersfield. They predicted that the stadium’s light, noise and traffic impacts will not bother area residents or present additional hurdles to city approval of the larger Bakersfield Commons project.  Upon receiving the team’s permit request Thursday afternoon, city staff scheduled a Dec. 11 hearing before the city’s Board of Zoning Adjustments to consider what amounts to an adjustment of the project’s existing approval.  Rhonda Smiley, assistant to Bakersfield City Manager Alan Tandy, who was away from the office Thursday, said city staff are “enthused” about working with The Blaze on the stadium. “Obviously the city … has been … long interested in bringing baseball — professional baseball — to a higher level in Bakersfield, in terms of an improved stadium,” Smiley said.

Laying groundwork

Some of the stadium’s groundwork is already in place. The Blaze has signed a 20-year, renewable lease with World Oil Corp., the property’s owner and developer of the Bakersfield Commons project.  The team has also hired two separate architectural firms – Pendulum Studio, a Kansas City, Mo. based firm with experience designing sports stadiums; and Fresno’s Teter Architects & Engineers. The builder is to be Bakersfield-based Wallace & Smith General Contractors.  The project’s real estate adviser is Grubb & Ellis – ASU & Associates in Bakersfield.  How the project will be paid for is less clear. The team’s owners declined to discuss details of the necessary financing, saying only that no public money will be involved and that they are looking for local investors to help them move forward with the stadium.  World Oil representatives said they see the project as key to kick-starting Bakersfield Commons, which wouldn’t begin building about 300,000 square feet of adjacent retail and restaurant space until about the time the stadium opens. Residential and office development would follow later.  “The Blaze stadium is the perfect catalyst to get this started,” World Oil principal Robert Roth said in a written statement.  Access to the stadium would come largely from the Coffee Road exit of the Westside Parkway, which is expected to be completed in the spring of 2012. Baseball fans will find some 830 parking spaces spread over eight acres.  Ticket prices have not yet been established but are expected to vary between $9 and $11 depending on where in the stadium the seat is located. Voiland said tickets won’t cost as much as $20.  “It’s still going to be family-priced entertainment,” he said.